Education for sustainable development (ESD): the turn away from ‘environment’ in environmental education?

Helen Kopnina
  • Environmental Education Research, October 2012, Taylor & Francis
  • DOI: 10.1080/13504622.2012.658028

Has education for sustainable development turned away from environment?

What is it about?

This article explores why has education for sustainable development turned away from environment and exposes robust anthropocentric bias in much of 'sustainable development'. Among other questions, this article inquires: Can poverty reduction be decoupled from economic growth and increase in consumption of natural resources? What factors should be accounted for to create a good assessment of quality of life? If the alternative path to economic development cannot be found, how can raising the standard of the living for developing countries’ people avoid potentially catastrophic impacts on the global ecosystem? What are ecocentric scholars concerned about in regard to natural resources? Since the future generations are not born yet and non-human species cannot speak for themselves, how can intergenerational justice and biospheric egalitarianism be addressed in democratic systems and what is the role of education in promoting environmental sustainability?

Why is it important?

This is probably te first time that an article within the field of environmental education and education for sustainable development challenges the very core assumptions and underlying ethics of the field. This article explores why has education for sustainable development turned away from environment and exposes robust anthropocentric bias in much of 'sustainable development'

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2012.658028

The following have contributed to this page: Dr Helen Kopnina