Requiem for the weeds: Reflections in Amsterdam city park

Helen Kopnina
  • Sustainable Cities and Society, December 2013, Elsevier
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.scs.2013.01.007

Urban planning, arks and sustainability

What is it about?

This article aims to re-examine the position of plants in the context of contemporary urban spaces through the prism of environmental ethics. Despite conceptual plurality and socio-cultural complexity of human–plant relationships, social scientists fail to note how the perception of ‘greenery’ has objectified plants in urban environment. Without seriously considering bioethics, theories of human–plant relationship might fail to note exploitive anthropocentric relationship between humans and plants in urban spaces. The article is inspired by reflections of urban flora in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Why is it important?

This article aims to re-examine the position of plants in the context of contemporary urban spaces through the prism of environmental ethics. Despite conceptual plurality and socio-cultural complexity of human–plant relationships, social scientists fail to note how the perception of ‘greenery’ has objectified plants in urban environment. Without seriously considering bioethics, theories of human–plant relationship might fail to note exploitative anthropocentric relationship between humans and plants in urban spaces. The article is inspired by reflections of urban flora in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Read Publication

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2013.01.007

The following have contributed to this page: Dr Helen Kopnina